Crushin’ and Crunchin’ on Crosnes

By Sean Kenniff | Aliza Eliazarov

By

Sean Kenniff
Aliza Eliazarov
Roasted Mackerel, Eggplant, Dashi Gelée, Crosnes, Dahlia Bulb, Pickled Nasturtium Berries, Radicchio, Radish
Roasted Mackerel, Eggplant, Dashi Gelée, Crosnes, Dahlia Bulb, Pickled Nasturtium Berries, Radicchio, Radish

It looks like a miniature ivory Glo Worm and tastes like the polyamorous love child of an artichoke, water chestnut, and potato chip. A crosne is a pinky-size tuber from China that gained popularity in France through its use in nouvelle cuisine. French being its language of origin, the crosne is easier to snack on than pronounce, with its crisp snap and intriguing shape. 2015 Boston Rising Star Restaurateur and Chef, Jason Bond, had been importing crosnes to his flagship Bondir—at much expense—from Paris until he gave a handful to a local farmer, who’s now growing them by the patchful. They’re still pricey at around $35 per pound, but he can now use them (cooked, pickled, fermented, and raw) more often in his dishes. In a summer composition, Bond has the crosnes snuggled up next to mackerel, dashi, eggplant, and dahlia bulb—adding dimension, flavor, and crunch to an already dynamite dish.     

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