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StarChefs

StarChefs.com International Chefs Congress Main Schedule

September 14th Schedule

09:00AM — 5:30PM
On-site registration open
  • Sunday Registration
  • On-site registration open
11:00AM — 6:35PM
Master of Ceremonies
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  • Main Stage
  • Ted Allen
  • Food Network and Bravo TV Host
    New York
11:05AM — 11:15AM
Welcome / 2008 Culinary Trends Report: A Look Forward and Back
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  • Main Stage
  • Antoinette Bruno - StarChefs.com Editor-In-Chief
  • starchefs.com
    New York
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  • Main Stage
  • Will Blunt - StarChefs.com Managing Editor
  • starchefs.com
    New York
11:15AM — 12:15PM
Keynote: Eating is a Multi-Sensory Experience
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  • Main Stage
  • Heston Blumenthal
  • The Fat Duck
    Berkshire, UK
  • Blumenthal’s presentation is inspired by his research for the television program, "Heston Blumenthal - Further Adventures In Search of Perfection Christmas Special," produced by the BBC in 2007. Blumenthal’s Christmas didn’t include your basic plum pudding – it led him instead to Oman (to harvest Frankincense) and Siberia (to milk a reindeer, of course). In his keynote address and presentation, he will discuss the ways in which this research ignites his imagination and factors into the creation and development of new dishes at The Fat Duck. Along with tales of these culinary-historical journeys, he will share the inspiration behind notable dishes such as Smoked Bacon and Egg Ice Cream, Flaming Sorbet, and “Sound of the Sea.”
12:15PM — 12:45PM
Traditional Mexican Techniques in a Fine Dining Context
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  • Main Stage
  • Enrique Olvera
  • Restaurante Pujol
    Mexico City
  • Mexican food is characterized by an incredible range of flavors and techniques, and this grand diversity is nowhere more apparent than in the streets of Mexico City. From esquites – a corn and epazote broth – to multiple styles of tacos and deep-fried foods, one can experience the cultural diversity of Mexico in a couple of bites. At Pujol, Enrique Olvera has garnered acclaim for his talent for re-imagining these culinary treasures and placing them in a fine dining atmosphere.

12:45PM — 2:15PM
Lunch
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  • Main Stage
  • Foods of Québec Lunch
1:00PM — 2:10PM
Chef/Producer Panel
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  • Business Seminar
  • Lyndon Matthews
  • Cervena Farmer and Owner, Puketira Deer Farm
    New Zealand
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  • Business Seminar
  • Graham Brown
  • The Cookhouse
    New Zealand
  • There’s no denying it – the country as a whole has wised up about local produce in the last 5 years. It’s getting easier to source, and there’s certainly more demand, but the system still has its problems. Yes, that may be the understatement of the year – but Dan Barber, Graham Brown, Mike Gingrich, Lyndon Matthews, and Tory Miller aren’t here to gripe about the farm bill or big corporation-backed industrial agriculture or any of the huge issues endemic to our food systems. They’re here to talk – in an uplifting, can-do manner – about how to make the local farm-to-chef connection work, everyday, in your restaurant.

    Chefs have a unique opportunity to help America transition from an industrial agriculture economy to an ecological one – through their leadership and example, they could do for agriculture what they've done for gastronomy; that is to say, re-invent it. But it can be hard to balance multiple small farmers, keeping track of who is growing what, when. And Farmers say that chefs sometimes call with unreasonable expectations, asking for the wrong thing at the wrong time.

    How can this disconnect be fixed? How can chefs access great local or artisan produce, and how can producers get their goods out there? How can the two form relationships that really work? In the spirit of greater understanding, these three chefs and two producers are coming together to talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they make it happen every day of the year. Miller and Barber, two of the best-known regionally-reliant chefs in the United States, will share their thoughts and experience. Gingrich, the producer of an artisan Wisconsin cheese, will share his success story. Brown and Matthews, New Zealand-based chef and deer farmer, respectively, will bring what is sure to be an exciting new perspective to the table.

1:00PM — 2:10PM
The Emperor's New Clothes: A Blind Tasting
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  • Wine Tasting
  • Madeline Triffon
  • Matt Prentice Restaurant Group
    Detroit
  • Today’s wine consumer is savvier than they know. If they dine out with any regularity, they experience wines in all styles and price points. Regular restaurant guests have developed an innate sense of price-value relationship. With the first sniff and sip, they can recognize if a wine over-delivers or is, frankly, a rip-off.

    Accordingly, Sommeliers have the responsibility to develop themselves as practiced tasters – aware of but detached from critical press and “the deal.” After all, “free” isn’t good enough if the wine doesn’t deliver! Whether tasting a Montepulciano d’Abruzzo or a wacky red blend from Paso Robles, as wine professionals, you should be able to spot the gems in a crowded field.

    Triffon’s seminar will be an exercise in blind tasting, and identifying great wines based on a series of common qualifiers. Can you recognize a wine’s quality independent of any frame of reference? Can you spot a gem without knowing the wine’s cost, growing region or even the dominant grape variety? Are you able to successfully sell obscure wines from emerging growing regions? Do you taste with confidence in your practiced technique regardless of the category?

    Whether a wine is a Napa Cabernet or an Assyrtiko from Santorini, its innate quality will speak volumes…if you speak its language. Balance, length, depth and fruit quality are some of the elements that define great wine. In this seminar, you will blind taste through 10 wines from around the world, some obscure, some not, with little concern for what it is, but intense interest in the answer to the question: “Is this good wine?”

1:00PM — 2:10PM
Bitters
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  • Mixology Workshop
  • Toby Maloney
  • The Violet Hour
    Chicago
  • Bitters are one of the most important substances in cocktail making – think of them as a seasoning which, when applied by the right hands, can elevate an exception exceptional libation to a sublime one. The idea of bitters is complex – Maloney’s most basic recipe has 35-40 ingredients – but the effect is basic: they add nuances and depths, and make drinks better! Maloney will begin with a brief history of bitters, followed by a sampling of numerous bitters available on the market, both commercial and artesian. He’ll then lead an experiment to see how bitters react with spirits, fresh juices, and sweeteners. Finally, he’ll lead the group in building three cocktails, which will show the two ways of using bitters – incorporating them versus laying them on top – and teaching through taste the many ways in which bitters can liven up a drink.
1:00PM — 2:10PM
Voulez-vous sous vide avec moi (ce soir)?
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  • Savory Workshop
  • Paul Liebrandt
  • Corton
    New York
  • Paul Liebrandt will share his love and knowledge of sous vide in this hands-on, how-to sous vide workshop. The main subject will be lamb, which Liebrandt will approach from various angles, including a discussion of the differences in cooking various cuts, enhancing the flavor via the introduction of flavored fats, and cooking times. Liebrandt will also discuss the techniques for cooking other proteins and vegetables, covering fundamentals like seasoning, marinating, and brining of proteins. He’ll give a user-friendly primer on cooking time, temperature, and resting, as well as demonstrating how to hold or reheat products during the course of dinner service. All are fundamental elements of cooking – just slightly changed (and made easier!) through the use of sous vide.
1:00PM — 2:10PM
Rising Stars How to Make It Career Panel
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  • Business Seminar
  • Rising Stars How to Make It Career Panel
  • While there is no clear-cut formula for success in the culinary industry, over time a collective wisdom on the subject does emerge. This year’s New York Rising Stars award winners come together to share their version of what works and what doesn’t – what they regret and what they’d do all over again – at the candid, informative, and often entertaining “How to Make it” chefs panel.

    Each of the StarChefs.com Rising Stars award winners has figured out for him/herself how to conquer the odds, finding success in their various pursuits, making it in one way or another. Of course, making it means different things for different chefs. For Josh Eden of Shorty’s .32, it means spending nearly a decade with Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and then taking a sharp turn and opening a small, personal, no-reservation restaurant bursting with home-cooked flavor and soul. For Yoshinori Ishii of Morimoto Omakase Bar it might mean training extensively in Japan, and finding a home for his culinary style, his hand-made pottery, and his hand-caught fish behind the omakase bar of one of New York’s biggest restaurants. For Mixologist Somer Perez of The Royalton it might mean learning from some of the best, and putting her knowledge to the test, re-vamping the beverage program of a major hotel at the age of 26.

    Their paths are different and so are their destinations; however, they all share ambition, an uncompromising palate, sense of culinary identity, pride in their work, and a timely concept – that’s why StarChefs.com named them all Rising Stars. A Rising Star is not a fixed concept: Rising Stars are future leaders with varying levels of current media attention and “success.” The StarChefs editorial selects them the old-fashioned way – that is, by actually meeting and tasting with every last one of them through a series of hundreds of tastings across the country. The resulting Rising Stars all have room to rise, and it’s our belief that they will only grow in their already impressive careers, further shaping their local culinary communities and the larger national culinary discourse.

    The “How to Make it” panel is their chance to share how they got to be themselves, and what they learned along the way. In lieu of a clear roadmap to success, they’ll instead offer their humorous industry anecdotes, trying times, and passionate perspectives, leaving their audience inspired to get back to their kitchens and do what they do best: make it.

1:00PM — 2:10PM
The FX Series: Texture, Flavor, and Technology
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  • Pastry Workshop
  • Dave Arnold
  • French Culinary Institute
    New York
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  • Pastry Workshop
  • Nils Noren
  • French Culinary Institute
    New York
  • Norén and Arnold are constantly on the lookout for the next technological breakthrough to inspire them as they continue to push the boundaries of culinary creations. By applying technology to familiar ingredients they manipulate perceptions of texture, flavor, and presentation, awakening new and unexpected sensations.

    Norén and Arnold have done a great deal of work with heat related technology, however they have recently set their sights on the effects of cold. Utilizing the precision and consistency of the Randell’s FX Series refrigerated drawer chilling system, the duo will demonstrate the fascinating array of textures and flavors that can be introduced through elemental changes in the coldness of familiar foods and beverages.

2:00PM — 2:15PM
Chef Responsibility
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  • Main Stage
  • Charlie Trotter
  • Charlie Trotter's
    Chicago
  • Charlie Trotter will talk about his various charitable ventures, his experience as a mentor, and his involvement in the Chicago community – not just the culinary community, but the community as a whole. Trotter is an example of the ways in which a chef can be a leader, and have a meaningful, positive impact on the community of which they are a part.
2:15PM — 3:00PM
The Evolution of Creativity
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  • Main Stage
  • Charlie Trotter
  • Charlie Trotter's
    Chicago
  • Along the culinary lines, Trotter will draw upon his 20-plus years at the forefront of American fine dining and present an exposition of creativity – and serve up a bit of modern American culinary history in the progress. Trotter will present a dish from over fifteen years ago, explaining the methodology, context, and techniques. He will then present the current interpretation of that dish, using the ingredients and techniques found in his kitchen today. The presentation will be a look at the evolution of creativity over time, and at the mechanics of, and inspiration behind, culinary progress.
3:00PM — 3:20PM
Sustainable Seafood
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  • Main Stage
  • Barton Seaver
  • Given that over 60% of seafood is consumed in restaurants, chefs can play a poignant role in offering a solution to the problem of resource management of our oceans. They hold a delicate and precarious position, perched between consumer demand and trend-setting; Seaver knows this – he’s been one for over a decade. In his presentation, he will speak to the ways in which a chef’s choices can have an impact and create change, and the possibility of teaching through your menu, your dishes, and your approach. He’ll share useful knowledge on how chefs can participate in choosing seafood responsibly, and will take a look at a leader in sustainable fishery management – Alaska – as well as purveyors such as Tobago Wild and developing fisheries on the coast of West Africa. Through his passion for the big picture and the little details, you’ll hopefully get the point: listen up now or your world is going to change before you realize it!
3:20PM — 4:05PM
Sustainable Seafood: The Future of Our Ocean
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  • Main Stage
  • Rick Moonen
  • RM Seafood
    Las Vegas
  • Customer interest in environmentally friendly food has spread from the land to the sea. Is your menu keeping up? Chef Rick Moonen will share the latest information on the issues that surround some of chefs’ favorite seafood – from shrimp to hamachi to salmon – and will discuss how chefs play an especially important role in determining what the future will be for both wild-caught and farmed fish. Making good seafood choices doesn't have to be difficult or costly; Moonen will share information on how to shift your purchasing to ocean-friendly seafood, and will lead you through the the tools and expertise that you'll need to do it right, including a look at well-managed fisheries that help make it easier to choose ocean-friendly products.

    Poor stock status, pirate fishing, bycatch, habitat destruction – these are some of the major issues plaguing popular seafood (Atlantic cod, Chilean seabass, tuna, and scallops, to name a few) around the globe. This year’s drastic decline of West Coast salmon has driven home the fact that habitat destruction is an immediate and pressing problem – and made it clear that it’s time for chefs to start effecting change.

4:05PM — 4:50PM
  • Networking Break
4:50PM — 5:35PM
The Role of a Chef
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  • Main Stage
  • Michael Ruhlman (Moderator)
  • Author
    Ohio
  • With the exponential rise of public and media attention focused on food and cooking, the meaning and character of the chef profession has changed. But what does that mean? Is a chef’s most important role as a force in the kitchen, or as a face for the media? Is the title of chef-restaurateur a false contraction – meaning if you’re a restaurateur, you can no longer truly be considered a chef? Where did chef fanaticism come from, and ultimately, what does it mean for the industry? What strings and responsibilities are attached?

    Three of the culinary industry’s most well-known characters will come together to discuss and debate the above and much, much more. Anthony Bourdain is a well-spoken and irreverent chef-turned-culinary adventurer, with a finger on the pulse of the culinary world and enough perspective to laugh at it. Marco Pierre White defined the term “bad boy chef,” and caused a stir when he relinquished his Michelin stars because he was no longer behind the stove every night. Michael Ruhlman is a seasoned culinary writer, with the savvy and sangfroid to sit between the two as they discuss, with passion, the role of a chef.

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