2016 South Florida Rising Star Sommelier Jeremy Broto-mur of Cafe Boulud Palm Beach

2016 South Florida Rising Star Sommelier Jeremy Broto-mur of Cafe Boulud Palm Beach
April 2016

Cafe Boulud Palm Beach
301 Australian Avenue
Palm Beach, FL 33480

Jeremy Broto-mur’s 10-year journey through the wine world to his current role at Cafe Boulud started with an internship as a commis waiter at Restaurant le Rive Droite in Villecomtal, France. At the time he was studying hospitality management at École Des Metiers du Gers, and felt instantly attracted to the energy of the front of house. He expanded his wine vocabulary at Jacques de Romas vocational school and received formal training  at the Four Seasons Paris. He held his first professional position as commis sommelier at two Michelin- star Château de La Chèvre d’Or, before he dropped the commis and became a sommelier at Hambleton Hall in Oakham, England.

In 2009, Broto-mur was a winning sommelier at the WorldSkills France competition, the same year he moved to Dublin for the assistant head sommelier position at Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud. Two years later, he served as assistant wine director at Philippe Rochat’s three Michelin-star Restaurant de l’Hotel de Ville in Switzerland. By 2012, he’d made it to Gary Danko in San Francisco, where he was sommelier for a year before returning to Switzerland as assistant wine director for Chef Anne Sophie Pic’s two Michelin-starred Beau-Rivage Palace Lausanne. Broto-mur received his certified sommelier designation from the Court of Master Sommeliers in 2015 and moved to Palm Beach later that year to take over his first wine program at Cafe Boulud.  



Interview with South Florida Rising Star Sommelier Jeremy Broto-Mur

Lisa Elbert: How did you develop an interest in wine?
Jeremy Broto-Mur: 
I became really interested in wine as soon as I started studying cuisine. I enrolled in a work-study program and trained in a family-owned restaurant located in the Gers, a little region famous for the quality and diversity of its food, and the production of Armagnac.

LE: How did you get your start in the industry?
JB: 
I staged in several renowned restaurants and had the opportunity to work one summer at the Chevre d'Or in Eze Village, which was operated at that time by Chef Philippe Labet.

LE: Who are your mentors?
JB: 
I've had several mentors since the beginning of my career, but most impactful is Mr. Thibaut Panas. We worked together for four years, for two hgihly acclaimed chefs in Switzerland.

LE: What is your philosophy on food and wine?
JB: 
Balance between wine and food. I also have learned to respect everyone's personal preferences.

LE: What is your philosophy behind building a wine list?
JB: 
I like the diversity. The main objective is to satisfy the guest by giving a large selection of wine styles, origins, and prices.

LE: What is your favorite wine resource?
JB: 
I have a large collection of books, and I like to visit websites like Guildsomm.com and Vinous.com, and Jancis Robinson.

LE: What wines do you favor for your cellar at home?
JB: 
I usually consume more white than red. I like to constantly discover new products from small-scale production.

LE: What wine trends would you most like to see in South Florida?
JB: 
I would love to see people drink more Gamay, Mencia, and Loire Valley Cabernet Franc. They are light, food-friendly, and very well-suited for the sub-tropical climate of South Florida.

Tips for the Sommelier from Jeremy Broto-Mur:

THE WORLD OF WINE IS INCREDIBLY DIVERSE.
A wine program should reflect the broad spectrum of a style and satisfy every palate by showcasing classic bottling, along with new, talented producers or a lesser known area to meet everyone’s price point.

TRAVEL TO DISCOVER FOOD AND WINE CULTURE.  
This is the most enjoyable part of our work and key to truly understanding a region. It provides insight and stories to share with guests and colleagues.

WORK WITH PASSION AND TRANSMIT YOUR KNOWLEDGE.  
The restaurant industry is filled with dedicated people. Our mission is to motivate through internal training, to make people comfortable, and get them more involved in the wine program. It will help improve sales and enhance guests’ experiences.

LOOK FOR NEW DISCOVERIES AND BARGAINS TO PRESENT.  
The most rewarding aspect of the job for a sommelier is to offer unique wines at an affordable price. Clients are just like us—we all love to be blown away by a wine that over-performed.