Sustainable, Traceable Fish at the Center of the Plate

By Caroline Hatchett | Briana Balducci | Will Blunt

By

Caroline Hatchett
Briana Balducci
Will Blunt
iradito: Fluke, Gooseberry, Ginger, Poppy, and Huacatay | Chef Erik Ramirez of Llama Inn
iradito: Fluke, Gooseberry, Ginger, Poppy, and Huacatay | Chef Erik Ramirez of Llama Inn

Adam Geringer-Dunn has a few buddies he’d like you to meet: rabbitfish, digfish, sea robbin, and his personal favorite—the one with the funny haircut—hogfish. Geringer-Dunn and his business partner, fifth generation fishmonger Vincent Milburn, are changing the retail and wholesale fish-supply game in New York with their markets in Brooklyn and Queens—doing for fishmongering what The Meat Hook did for butchery in 2010. A Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch partner, Greenpoint Fish & Lobster focuses on domestic, wild caught seafood, including invasive species, bycatch, underutilized fish, and the usual local suspects like fluke and bass. For their work in transparency and traceability, some of the city’s best restaurants seek out their daily catch. “It’s great to have people like them dictating changes in our menu and providing us with seafood that is some of the best I've had. It’s the relationship every restaurant dreams of,” said Chef Nick Curtola of The Four Horsemen.  Here are five superlative dishes with Greenpoint Fish & Lobster’s product at the center of the plate—including one from their own chef, Julie Cole.

Above: Tiradito: Fluke, Gooseberry, Ginger, Poppy, and Huacatay | Chef Erik Ramirez of Llama Inn

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