The Butcher's Broth

By Sophie Canter | Briana Balducci

By

Sophie Canter
Briana Balducci
Bone broth on tap, featuring Pho (left) and The Cure (right)
Bone broth on tap, featuring Pho (left) and The Cure (right)

Over the past few years, some unexpected trends have taken hold. There was toast from San Francisco, and poke out of L.A. Bone broth began to bubble up in 2014, when New York Chef Marco Canora launched Brodo. Western Daughters Butcher Shoppe in Denver took note, and owners Kate Kavanaugh and Josh Curtiss have dedicated counter space to a broth set-up. Customers can pump their choice of broth from thermoses into to-go cups, and our favorite flavor was “The Cure,” infused with turmeric, ginger, lemon, and cayenne. The Western Daughters team simmers the bones—from grass-fed beef, lamb, pork, and chicken raised within 150 miles—for 48 hours. Two pounds of bones equals one quart broth, which sells for $6 per cup. Profitability, sustainability, and trend-worthiness aren’t mutual exclusive.

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